Consider: “Getting Things Done”

David Allen is a coach who has written several books on productivity. One is titled, Getting Things Done: The Art of Stress-free Productivity, and it may be one to consider if you are looking for an in-depth reboot of how you handle all you have to do. A taste of his message and style can be seen here:

Your personal system and behaviors need to be established in such a way that you can see all the action options you need to see, when you need to see them. This is really just common sense, but few people actually have their processes and their organization honed to the point where they are as functional as they could be.

_________________

When people with whom you interact notice that without fail you receive, process, and organize in an airtight manner the exchanges and agreements they have with you, they begin to trust you in a unique way. More significantly, you incorporate a level of self-confidence in your engagement with your world that money cannot buy. Such is the power of capturing placeholders for anything that is incomplete or unprocessed in your life. It noticeably enhances your mental well-being and improves the quality of your communications and relationships, both personally and professionally.

 

These books are only set here as possibilities for you to explore. Posts and links are not endorsements or paid publicity.

Consider: “The Gospel Comes with a House Key”

Rosaria Butterfield has published a book on “radically ordinary hospitality” this year. Her passion for ministry as a family from the home is described through a number of personal stories and supported by her reasoning for investing in that form of ministry. Below are two short quotations from The Gospel Comes with a House Key: Practicing Radically Ordinary Hospitality in Our Post-Christian World by Rosaria Butterfield:

God intends this blessing to come from you. And real Christian hospitality that creates real Christian community expresses authentic Christianity in deep and abiding ways to a world that thinks we are hypocrites.

There are, of course, other ways you can use your days, your time, your money, and your home. But opening your front door and greeting neighbors with soup, bread, and the words of Jesus are the most important. Who knows but that this simple task of sharing the gospel where you are, wherever you are, might just be used by God to change the world?

These books are only set here as possibilities for you to explore. Posts and links are not blanket endorsements or paid publicity.

Consider: Spiritual Mothering

The idea of mentoring can be scary and intimidating, but those of us who have experienced it walk away knowing the great benefit! Below is an encouragement from Spiritual Mothering by Susan Hunt:

The eighteenth century poet and historian, Matthew Arnold, said: “If ever the world sees a time when women shall come together purely and simply for the benefit and good of mankind, it will be a power such as the world has never seen.” I agree. But the problem is that women will never come together purely and simply for the benefit and good of others because of the self-centeredness of our sin nature. The what’s-in-it-for-me mentality forbids such selflessness. However, Christian women, because of the power of grace, can overcome their self-centeredness. Christian women can manifest the other-centered virtues that characterize spiritual mothering. In fact, I would restate Matthew Arnold in this way: If ever the world sees a time when Christian women shall come together purely and simply to encourage and equip other women to live for God’s glory, it will be a power such as the world has never seen.

These books are only set here as possibilities for you to explore. Posts and links are not endorsements or paid publicity.

Consider: How Can I Feel Productive as a Mom?

Is that an appealing title for mothers or what? You also may be interested to know that it’s only 35 pages long. To help if you are wondering whether it is the best choice for you to read, here is an excerpt from How Can I Feel Productive as a Mom? by Esther Engelsma:

When your children seem to be getting in the way of your work, remind yourself that God’s call to you is not to get things done but to use time well, and then do whatever is the best use of your time in that moment.

When your tasks seem mundane, remind yourself that God’s will for you is not to get things done but to grow in sanctification, and then focus on how each task done for God is making you more like Christ.

When your goals and dreams seem to be on hold, remind yourself that God’s purpose for you is not to get things done but to glorify Him, and then empty yourself willingly, grasping His promise that His burden is easy, resting content in knowing that one day you will see with your own eyes how He has worked everything together for your good and His glory.

These books are only set here as possibilities for you to explore. Posts and links are not endorsements or paid publicity.

Mind is Like an Attic

Any Sherlock Holmes fans out there?

He was a bit of an oddball, yes, but some of the quirks have things worth thinking about.

“I consider that a man’s brain originally is like a little empty attic, and you have to stock it with such furniture as you choose. A fool takes in all the lumber of every sort that he comes across, so that the knowledge which might be useful to him gets crowded out, or at best is jumbled up with a lot of other things, so that he has a difficulty in laying his hands upon it. Now the skillful workman is very careful indeed as to what he takes into his brain-attic. He will have nothing but the tools which may help him in doing his work, but of these he has a large assortment, and all in the most perfect order. It is a mistake to think that that little room has elastic walls and can distend to any extent. Depend upon it there comes a time when for every addition of knowledge you forget something that you knew before. It is of the highest importance, therefore, not to have useless facts elbowing out the useful ones.” (Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, A Study in Scarlet)

The basic principle of being careful about with what we fill up our minds is valid. Do you know the ins and outs of the latest popular TV series, but have trouble remembering the story of Ruth? Have you tried out every hobby known to woman, but Scripture memorization would just be too much time and effort?

Our brains are limited (more some days than others, am I right?), and that makes every thing we learn or remember valuable. The key is whether the value of the mind-space matches the value of what we stocked in it.