Good Ideas: Giant Bullet Journal Pad

Bullet journaling is quite the fad. The benefits are great, and the layout can be beautiful. But it can be hard to keep up with the journal, and multiple pages can get out of hand.

How about this — a giant paper pad with just a few bullet journal ideas on it? You pick the items that work best for you and your family. Ideas abound on Pinterest and other web sites. Friends can be a rich source also. Then pull out the markers and color it up, large-scale and easy to read. If you post it in a public space, it will be hard to ignore too!

This could be the fun, workable, convenient, manageable way for you to use some of the beautiful journal ideas you’ve seen. Take a look.

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Unpleasant Duties

“Disorganization, procrastination, addiction to technology, or refusal to do unpleasant duties tends to stress us more than diligence, organization, decisiveness, or self-denial.”

Reset by David Murray has a good point here. Are we shooting ourselves in the foot sometimes? Putting off things we need to do, leaving the mess because it’s overwhelming, not mopping the floor for a month because we really hate it?

Most of us would agree that we don’t like stress and its effects on us. We’ve even heard, and tried to ignore, the health horror stories of how stress makes you sick over time.

BUT

Has that made a difference in how we tackle life?

  • Making an hour to plan out two weeks of meals will cut out the daily stress of answering “What’s for dinner?” with “I have no idea!” for a beautiful 14 days.
  • Creating a cleaning routine and racing yourself to finish the daily section will take the stress out of housework piling up and add a little bit of fun to your day.
  • Going to the grocery stores for the main shopping with a list and a plan saves time and constant decisions in the store.
  • Biting the bullet and cleaning out that closet you try not to see will give you access to storage and a more peaceful environment. Then you can exercise tiny bits of effort to maintain the order and hold off the chaos from coming back.
  • Having a current to-do list and calendar keeps the day on track and gives you the comfort of knowing where you are going and what you truly need to do.

Just one of these steps will help you and your stress level and the peace of your household. It will take some effort up front, but that work will pay off over and over after that.

Habits Help

Each day a million thoughts run through your head. You see and hear lots of good things to try. Your goals are many and varied. But, how to do it?!?

We have discussed multiple strategies on this blog that help answer that question, and today we will add one more aspect.

Routines are effective. The more habits you can create in your day and then string together into a routine, the more you will accomplish without thinking about it. Yes, it takes time to build those habits, but the investment pays off immensely in the future.

When you think about eating an elephant one bite at a time, habits are a great illustration of “one bite” a day. If you do one thing every day (or every weekday), how much would be accomplished in a month? Or a year? If you want to do something more (like exercise or read), doing that thing 10 minutes a day will add up. After a few months, you will indeed have done something more.

Habits provide rest. When you get to the point that you have a habit (like brushing your teeth), you don’t have to think about what you are doing while you are doing it. Some days that is a micro-nap for your brain; other days it is free space for creative or deep thinking. Make the most of it!

Also, we are not designed to go full-out all day long. Scattering mental breaks throughout your day gives you a chance to catch your breath — while still accomplishing what you continually need in hygiene or chores or growth — before expending energy on the major efforts of the day.

Structure builds security. When you know the road you’re on, you are comfortable lifting your foot to take a step. In complete darkness in an unfamiliar room — not so much. When your routine is established, making exceptions is safer. When you know what to expect, you will naturally feel less anxious. You can be confident you will come back to the “normal” day. Bases are covered, so a special activity is not a concern.  If you have put wise effort into big picture planning ahead of time, you can relax and enjoy the small trip.

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Not only do these points all apply to us, they also help with children. A regular, daily routine will:

  • minimize repeated instruction (they know what they are doing; they do it every day), and
  • require less energy in creating and communicating a new schedule for every hour and every activity.
  • Children love the security of structure. Once it is established, they will be active advocates for keeping it in place and you on track!

Everything in Its Place

A place for everything, and everything in its place.

This is key for organization. It’s not the cute boxes and nifty shelves. It’s that things are assigned to places. When they are needed, they can be found and used; when they are not needed, they return to base.

Unfortunately, jazzy systems can only go so far. Putting everything in place, no matter how wonderful that place is, requires discipline. Ugh!

Now, we’re not talking boot camp discipline here. Perfectionism is not required, even though it would keep those shelves absolutely perfectly organized. But that (fortunately) is not the ultimate goal. Keeping things orderly has several purposes, but none that should be overtaken. Reflecting God’s character is lovely, but obsessive organization shouldn’t become a god. Making the best use of our resources is ideal, but shouldn’t be the ultimate driver. Saving time is great, but we don’t need more time just for the sake of having free time.

Keeping things in place is a way to serve God, your family, and everyone around you. If you make a habit of using things and then returning them to a reasonable location, you will have fewer hindrances as you fulfill your purpose. The frustration you feel when your home is a disaster area can be minimized. The time wasted searching for necessary books and papers before school can be converted to a calm departure and good conversation on the way to school. You don’t have to tear the house apart for a bandaid when the skinned knee comes limping in from outside. Guests are welcomed to a home that is lived in but not hazardous. Bills can be paid on time rather than lost in scattered stashes of mail.

Basically, it’s not rocket science or out-of-reach creativity. You can do the simple, basic steps needed to bring order to your household and life. Not perfect order, but purposeful order.

Clean Cars

As promised, here’s how my truck-cleaning effort went. The entire process took 1 hour, although I did not vacuum (since our cordless went with my husband the day I did this). Most likely the time for pictures and setup this time around would offset cleaning time for a normal routine.

Back Seat Storage

Since I have a truck, the interior storage is primarily under the back seat and in the console. I tackled the largest area first! Before are pictures of the space, all the stuff originally in it, and the final arrangement.

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I put all my extra shopping bags in one bag, which fits nicely in the shallow middle. The pillow and picnic blanket went in one well. My road trip guides and other books went in the other well. The umbrella and ice scraper went on the ledge in the back. The insulated bag is on top of it all on the driver’s side, because that is what I grab most often.

Since several tools and notepads and other items had accumulated since the last cleaning, I took those and put them in the appropriate areas for when I got there.

Console

This started out pretty ugly; we use this most often when driving because it’s easiest to reach.

truck 11The keys here are to 1) only have what you need handy and 2) contain the small items. I stacked the flat books and iPod. Medicine and keys/bobbypins/money went in two separate cheap plasticware boxes that I pulled out of the kitchen drawer. The manual went in the glove box and the napkins went in the grab bag (seen later).

Doors

I love the deep pockets in the doors. My driver door has my favorite shopping bags, because usually I only use two or three, and gum. The other side has activity books for traveling and the GPS. Here I simply had to take out the trash and stuff that had migrated to the wrong section.

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Truck 1

 

 

 

 

Grab Bag

Truck bagBecause of the limited storage, I like to keep a tote bag with various things handy. Mine sits in the middle of the back seat (on the hump), but it is easy to move temporarily if the back seat is full. This is where the food items (snacks, napkins, straws), wipes, towel, emergency toy, and such are stored. It is arranged so I can reach in and get what is needed without searching or unpacking.

Other

Truck cordThis time around, I used an idea from Pinterest browsing to corral the charging cords that typically spread all over the front. A Command hook next to the charger worked nicely.

Also, I always have a trash bag in the middle of the front seat. Sometimes it is a small plastic bag. A box or cereal storage bin or cheap car accessory works well also.  The important thing is that it is handy and used (and emptied occasionally…).

The back of the truck has the big stuff, since it is available. Two lawn chairs, a tool box, and a tote to hold anything needed for transport are what stay in the back. The tool box and tote contain smaller things that would otherwise just float around and scatter while driving. They are both easy to grab for use when needed.

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I hope this encouraged and helped you — or will someday in the future. Nothing I did required a trip to the store; I just used what I had. You can put more effort and money into it, but it isn’t necessary in order to keep to the organizing principles. Best wishes on your efforts in this area!