Good Ideas: Giant Bullet Journal Pad

Bullet journaling is quite the fad. The benefits are great, and the layout can be beautiful. But it can be hard to keep up with the journal, and multiple pages can get out of hand.

How about this — a giant paper pad with just a few bullet journal ideas on it? You pick the items that work best for you and your family. Ideas abound on Pinterest and other web sites. Friends can be a rich source also. Then pull out the markers and color it up, large-scale and easy to read. If you post it in a public space, it will be hard to ignore too!

This could be the fun, workable, convenient, manageable way for you to use some of the beautiful journal ideas you’ve seen. Take a look.

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Protect the Space

We have talked several times about calendars and to-do lists. Today will build on that by emphasizing the how important it is to capture information onto your tools to save your mental real estate.

We know this. Only so many facts can tumble around on our front burner before some start disappearing. If we are brutally honest, it’s a pretty small number of facts.

If the reminder is important enough to think about, it’s important enough to put in a safe place, ready when needed. The sooner that happens, the more space there is to fully address the present moment or think about other important things. You can work out what tool works best for you, whether it be an app on your phone or a notepad on the counter. It doesn’t have to be pretty, but it’s crucial to have something!

Now, this will only work if the place you put your thoughts is accessible. If you use 20 sticky notes scattered all over, you will not be able to find most of them when you need to review your thoughts. You need one place* to capture items.

*This may mean one place for work projects and one calendar for home and one notebook for schoolwork, but be careful not to split out too much.

It is vitally important to both write down and look over your tasks and plans. You need both to make things work. If you write it down and forget forever, that was getting rid of the thought not keeping it safe. If you review your plans, on a daily or weekly basis — as needed for the topics, you will stay on top of your goals and responsibilities without having to constantly rehearse every detail in your mind all day long.

What To Do When

Prepare your work outside;
get everything ready for yourself in the field,
and after that build your house. Proverbs 24:27

Why on earth would you work outside before building yourself a house?

Well, you can live in a tent while you till and plant, and then you have a home-building project to keep you busy while you wait for the crop to ripen. Now you have a house and a harvest. The other way around leaves you hungry in a cozy home.

The order you work on projects, or tasks, or toward goals, matters most of the time.

Stagger your progress. If I know I have to make brownies and take a shower before heading to a party, wouldn’t it make sense to mix up the brownies first? Then I can get ready while the brownies bake.

If you have multiple steps for a project and you know you will have to wait on others along the way, plan out when you will do each one and where you will have to wait. Get the ball rolling, and then you can turn your attention to other priorities while you wait for a response. After you get what you need in response, move to the next step until you have to wait again. You will be able to keep moving along your timeline and tend to other tasks at the same time.

For another simple example, we can get a lot done in between running loads of laundry, but we do have to put a load in the washing machine to start. But if we wait until it has to be done to put it in, we’re looking at a frustrating wait.

Taking a minute or two to think through the overall plan will pay off for you. Stepping back to look at the big picture will help you cut out the unpleasant surprises and unexpected delays that will prevent you from accomplishing your goal on time. Making a plan and walking through steps in the best order will pay off for you.

Share the Joy

Remember when we talked about pruning your to-do list? Well, there is another way to keep your task load in good shape.

Keep in mind that responsibility doesn’t always mean doing it with your own hands.

  • If your time can be better spent elsewhere and your budget allows, use a grocery pick service or even delivery service.
  • You may like how your dishwasher loading system works, but would your call to love your children include training them in that particular chore and responsibility?

An excellent help in looking for delegation opportunities can be found in your husband and/or your boss. Taking a step back and getting a wider view can make a big change in your perspective. They see what you can’t, right in the middle of each day.

  • If your husband values your time more than a cooked-from-scratch meal (and, again, your budget allows), perhaps sandwiches or (relatively) healthy takeout should be in the weekly meal plan more often. A walk together before dinner might be a better use of your time.
  • Are you spending a large percentage of your day doing something that is really someone else’s responsibility or could be easily transferred? Check. Your boss may rather you do what only you can do. You may add more value and more excellent work by eliminating that task from your list.

Delegation can be good, not an automatic failure. Yes, this can take an investment in money or training, but the goal would be one less task for your every day and time freed up for what is most valuable and can serve God best with your time.

Cut It Loose

A to-do list can be a great tool. But like every great tool, it’s not magic. It does take skill to use and maintain excellent tools. How can we hone our skill set with this tool?

One way is pruning. When you look at your to-do list, if it doesn’t fit with your priorities, both daily and ultimate, and is not reasonable for the day or current situation, cut it loose. Chop it off. Let it go.

This will help keep you on point, staying on the path to which you have been called. Paying attention to your priorities in the little, daily tasks will help you as you make the best use of your time each day. There are many good things, but you cannot do EVERY good thing. Examine your list and make sure you are doing what is best.

If you have 12 things on your list, review them to see if some really don’t reflect love for God or for your neighbor or help you do either of those things.

  • Did you write it down initially because it sounded cool, but now you’re really not sure why it would be good to do? Cross it off and move on.
  • Are you adding items to make you feel productive or important? “Look how long my list is. I’m irreplaceable.” Let’s go back to your identity as a child of God only by the grace of God (Ephesians 2:8-10). Test your list in light of that truth.
  • Does your day look like everyone else’s because you feel you need to go with the flow? Just because a friend or even a reality TV star arranges fresh flowers for her home everyday, doesn’t mean that you must. (Your allergy-prone friend might even thank you for not!) Just because your neighbor does it, doesn’t mean you have to. You answer to God for your time and she for hers, and you can both hear “Well done” with task lists that don’t match. If there is no value other than peer pressure, get rid of it.

Pruning will also help you stop sabotaging yourself. Often we hang on to things that we will never actually do (and shouldn’t necessarily do) and repeat the failure loop. Set yourself up for success, true success. Bring glory to God in all that you do.